British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa
British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa
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Records: 1 to 8 of 8


Saturday, September 8
Ontario and Quebec's Irish Pioneers: Farmers, Labourers and Lumberjacks  (Monthly Meeting)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Using wide-ranging sources, Lucille Campey will describe the communities established by the Irish in Ontario and Quebec during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. She will reveal the considerable pioneering achievements of the Irish, while debunking the victim-ridden interpretations of more recent times.
 
The Irish were early birds. They arrived in mid Canada long before the English and became assimilated in the wider population much sooner. They had left their homeland to achieve a better standard of living and be part of a more egalitarian society and were phenomenally successful. By 1871 they were the largest immigrant group in Ontario and, in Quebec, outnumbered the combined total of Scottish and English immigrants. They founded many communities and had an immense impact on the economic development of both provinces.
 
The ships that brought them are also discussed and an overview is provided of the events in Ireland and Canada that shaped this immigration saga.
 
About the speaker
Ottawa-born Lucille Campey began her career in Canada as a scientist, obtaining an honours degree in chemistry from Ottawa University. Following her marriage to Geoff, she moved to England and later acquired a Masters degree from Leeds University on medieval history. Having worked for the British Conservative Party, she became a Special Advisor to a Cabinet Minister in John’s Major’s government. This provided her with an understanding of the inner workings of government which she uses in her immigration studies.
 
After obtaining a doctorate at Aberdeen University on Scottish emigration to Canada, she wrote eight books on the Scots. She went on to write three on the English and two on the Irish, all published by Dundurn. A third book on the Irish is due out in 2020. In 2016 she was awarded the British Association for Canadian Studies Prix du Quebec. Lucille and Geoff live near Salisbury in Wiltshire.
 
Open to the public.


Saturday, September 15
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Group)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Rooms 226 and 228, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. All of us, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.


Friday, September 28 through Sunday, September 30
24th Annual Family History Conference  (Conference)
Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Join us at our 24th Annual Family History Confernce. Our main sessions take place on Saturday and Sunday, with seminars on Friday. 
 
This year's conference focuses on two main themes, Scottish family history and genetic genealogy, plus other areas of interest. Learn more here...
 
The marketplace is open to the public.



Saturday, October 6
DNA Special Interest Group  (Special Interest Group)
9:30 am to 12:00 pm
Room 115, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Members meet to share experiences, information and ideas and learn about the use of DNA evidence in exploring family history. Attendees will be required to sign in and out at the reception desk on the ground floor.
 
Visit DNA Interest Group section for more information and links to online resources.
 
Open to the public.


Saturday, October 13
Establishing Mitochondrial DNA Signatures of Early Immigrant Mothers: Successes and Cautions  (Monthly Meeting)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Do you know that group projects are establishing the ancestral mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) signatures of early North American immigrants?  Learn from Annette Cormier O'Connor about their methods, successes, and limitations, using the immigrants to New France as exemplars.
 
Most Canadians’ family trees trace back to an immigrant mother who passed on her mtDNA; you use it each time you need energy to move or think because mitochondria are our energy factories. To trace the source of your mtDNA in a matriline, start with your mother, her mother, and so on, back to an immigrant mother.
 
Family Tree DNA’s projects bring together descendants whose entire mtDNA code (signature) is tested and expert leaders who verify matrilines to group signatures under each immigrant’s name. An immigrant’s signature is confirmed when two of her documented descendants have: 1) matching mtDNA; and 2) matrilines converging on two different daughters. Confirmed signatures provide biological proof of documented matrilines and help those with record gaps to find their immigrant mother.
 
About the speaker
Annette Cormier O’Connor, MScN (Nursing, U Toronto), PhD (Medical Science, U Toronto). Retired professor and passionate genealogist.
 
Annette's passion for genealogy was ignited 10 years ago during Lesley Anderson’s “Rattle them Bones” course and subsequent courses at the National Institute for Genealogical Studies. During a 2013 quest to find the immigrant mother who passed on her mtDNA to her, she completed an NIGS course in genetic genealogy and joined several FTDNA immigrant projects, whose lead experts generously shared their knowledge. She was so moved by this experience that she so moved by this experience that she now volunteers with Cornwall’s Genealogy Centre members to learn how to use mtDNA testing to confirm their documented matrilines or to bridge record gaps to find their immigrant mother.
 
Open to the public.


Saturday, October 20
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Group)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Rooms 226 and 228, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. All of us, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.



Saturday, November 3
DNA Special Interest Group  (Special Interest Group)
9:30 am to 12:00 pm
Room 115, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Members meet to share experiences, information and ideas and learn about the use of DNA evidence in exploring family history. Attendees will be required to sign in and out at the reception desk on the ground floor.
 
Visit DNA Interest Group section for more information and links to online resources.
 
Open to the public.


Saturday, November 17
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Group)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Rooms 226 and 228, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. All of us, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.