British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa
British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa
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Friday, September 28 through Sunday, September 30
24th Annual Family History Conference  (Conference)
Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario

Genetic genealogy and Scottish family history are this year's focus. There are other areas of interest and workshops on Friday. Conference details
 
The marketplace is open to the public.
 



Saturday, October 6
DNA Special Interest Group  (Special Interest Group)
9:30 am to 12:00 pm
Room 115, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Members meet to share experiences, information and ideas and learn about the use of DNA evidence in exploring family history. Attendees will be required to sign in and out at the reception desk on the ground floor.
 
Visit the DNA Research Guide for more information and links to online resources.
 
Open to the public


Saturday, October 13
Using Local Family History Societies in Your Genealogical Research  (Before BIFHSGO Education Talk)
9:00 am to 9:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario

Marianne Rasmus will share tips on why and how to use local family history societies in your family history research. She will share some of the resources available and concrete examples of how this often-over-looked tool can be used to flesh out ancestor’s stories and break down brick walls.

About the speaker
 
Born and raised in Vancouver, Marianne Rasmus spent most of her life in BC, experiencing life on Vancouver Island, in BC’s north and in the Fraser Valley. But when the opportunity for a mid-life adventure came, Marianne and her husband, Bill, took the plunge and moved to Ottawa in 2013.
 
After reluctantly taking Canadian History as a “filler” course in college, Marianne discovered an interest and passion for history she never expected. That interest took on new meaning, and some might say became an obsession, when she began her family history journey in 2008 and started unearthing long-forgotten stories in both her and her husband’s family trees. Marianne and Bill have been married for almost 35 years and have two sons and two granddaughters.

Open to the public

Bio: Marianne Rasmus

Born and raised in Vancouver, Marianne spent most of her life in BC, experiencin

g life on Vancouver

Island

,

in

BC

s north and

in

the Fraser Valley. But when the opportunity for a mid-life adventure came,

Marianne and her husband, Bill, took the plunge and moved to Ottawa in

2013.

After reluctantly taking

Canadian History

as a

͞

filler

͟

course in college

,

Marianne discovered an interest

and passion for history she never expected.

Th

at

interest took on new meaning, and some might say

became an obsession, when she began her family history journey in 2008, and

began to unearth long

forgotten stories

in

both hers and her husband

s family trees. Marianne and her husband, Bill, have

been married for almost 35 years and have two sons and two granddaughters.

Using Local Family History Societies in Your Genealogical

Research

Marianne will share tips on why and how to use local family history societi

es in your family history

research. She will share some of the resources available and concrete examples of how t

his often-over-

looked tool can be used to flesh out ancestor

s stories and break down brick walls

Bio: Marianne Rasmus

Born and raised in Vancouver, Marianne spent most of her life in BC, experiencin

g life on Vancouver

Island

,

in

BC

s north and

in

the Fraser Valley. But when the opportunity for a mid-life adventure came,

Marianne and her husband, Bill, took the plunge and moved to Ottawa in

2013.

After reluctantly taking

Canadian History

as a

͞

filler

͟

course in college

,

Marianne discovered an interest

and passion for history she never expected.

Th

at

interest took on new meaning, and some might say

became an obsession, when she began her family history journey in 2008, and

began to unearth long

forgotten stories

in

both hers and her husband

s family trees. Marianne and her husband, Bill, have

been married for almost 35 years and have two sons and two granddaughters.

Using Local Family History Societies in Your Genealogical

Research

Marianne will share tips on why and how to use local family history societi

es in your family history

research. She will share some of the resources available and concrete examples of how t

his often-over-

looked tool can be used to flesh out ancestor

s stories and break down brick walls

Bio: Marianne Rasmus

Born and raised in Vancouver, Marianne spent most of her life in BC, experiencin

g life on Vancouver

Island

,

in

BC

s north and

in

the Fraser Valley. But when the opportunity for a mid-life adventure came,

Marianne and her husband, Bill, took the plunge and moved to Ottawa in

2013.

After reluctantly taking

Canadian History

as a

͞

filler

͟

course in college

,

Marianne discovered an interest

and passion for history she never expected.

Th

at

interest took on new meaning, and some might say

became an obsession, when she began her family history journey in 2008, and

began to unearth long

forgotten stories

in

both hers and her husband

s family trees. Marianne and her husband, Bill, have

been married for almost 35 years and have two sons and two granddaughters.

Using Local Family History Societies in Your Genealogical

Research

Marianne will share tips on why and how to use local family history societi

es in your family history

research. She will share some of the resources available and concrete examples of how t

his often-over-

looked tool can be used to flesh out ancestor

s stories and break down brick walls



Saturday, October 13
Establishing Mitochondrial DNA Signatures of Early Immigrant Mothers: Successes and Cautions  (Monthly Meeting)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Do you know that group projects are establishing the ancestral mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) signatures of early North American immigrants? Learn from Annette Cormier O'Connor about their methods, successes, and limitations, using the immigrants to New France as exemplars.
 
Most Canadians’ family trees trace back to an immigrant mother who passed on her mtDNA; you use it each time you need energy to move or think, because mitochondria are our energy factories. To trace the source of your mtDNA in a matriline, start with your mother, her mother, and so on, back to an immigrant mother.
 
Family Tree DNA’s projects bring together descendants whose entire mtDNA code (signature) is tested and expert leaders who verify matrilines to group signatures under each immigrant’s name. An immigrant’s signature is confirmed when two of her documented descendants have: 1) matching mtDNA; and 2) matrilines converging on two different daughters. Confirmed signatures provide biological proof of documented matrilines and help those with record gaps to find their immigrant mother.
 
About the speaker
 
Annette Cormier O’Connor, MScN (Nursing, U Toronto), PhD (Medical Science, U Toronto) is a retired professor and passionate genealogist.
 
Annette's passion for genealogy was ignited 10 years ago, during Lesley Anderson’s “Rattle Them Bones” course and subsequent courses at the National Institute for Genealogical Studies. During a 2013 quest to find the immigrant mother who passed on her mtDNA to her, she completed an NIGS course in genetic genealogy and joined several FTDNA immigrant projects, whose lead experts generously shared their knowledge. She was so moved by this experience that she that she now volunteers with Cornwall’s Genealogy Centre members to learn how to use mtDNA testing to confirm their documented matrilines or to bridge record gaps to find their immigrant mother.
 
Open to the public
 


Saturday, October 20
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Group)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Rooms 226 and 228, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. All of us, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.
 
Open to the public



Saturday, November 3
DNA Special Interest Group  (Special Interest Group)
9:30 am to 12:00 pm
Room 115, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Members meet to share experiences, information and ideas and learn about the use of DNA evidence in exploring family history. Attendees will be required to sign in and out at the reception desk on the ground floor.
 
Visit the DNA Research Guide for more information and links to online resources.
 
Open to the public


Saturday, November 10
Introduction to the Scottish Special Interest Group  (Before BIFHSGO Education Talk)
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Several members of the Scottish SIG will discuss its aims and activities.

Open to the public
 


Saturday, November 10
Beechwood National Cemetery: Its History, Stories and Records  (Monthly Meeting)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario

Beechwood Funeral, Cemetery and Cremation Services was founded in 1873, on a 160-acre tract of land on the outskirts of Ottawa. It became a prime example of the type of rural cemetery that emerged in the U.S. and Canada in the nineteenth century, characterized by winding roads, picturesque vistas, wooded groves, and unique landscaping, as well as monuments and markers of considerable architectural and historical interest. Originally Ottawa's Anglo-Protestant cemetery, today Beechwood is a reflection of Canada’s identity as a multicultural, multi-faith society. Since the creation of its Foundation in 2000, it has grown in national significance: home of the National Military Cemetery (2001), recognized as a National Historic Site (2001), home of the RCMP National Memorial Cemetery (2004), given honorary recognition as the national cemetery of Canada (2009), and home of the Ottawa Police Service Memorial Cemetery (2011). With almost 400 famous burials, and over 75,000 total burials of people from all walks of life, Beechwood serves as a place of national tribute and remembrance for all Canadians.

About the speaker

Dr. André M. Levesque is a leading expert in history, heritage, commemoration and recognition. He served with the CAF Army Reserves for 35 years and retired in 2008 at the rank of lieutenant-colonel. In his civilian career, he worked in the area of planning and economic development with the City of Ottawa. In 2001, he became a public servant with DND and in 2006 was appointed Director Honours and Recognition for the CAF. From 2013 to 2016, he was DG Commemoration at Veterans Affairs and is currently a visiting scholar with the Royal Military College of Canada. André holds a B.A. and M.A. in geography from Carleton University and in 2013, he completed a Ph.D. in history from the National University of Ireland, Cork. Since 2016 he has been Chief Historian (volunteer) with Beechwood Cemetery. He was admitted in the Canadian Who’s Who, and is an Officer of the Order of Military Merit and a Knight of the French Legion of Honour.

 


Saturday, November 17
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Group)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Rooms 226 and 228, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. All of us, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.
 
Open to the public



Saturday, December 8
Kick off celebrations for BIFHSO's 25th anniversary  (Special Event)
9:00 am to 10:00 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Join your fellow members to socialize with light refreshments to celebrate the launch of BIFHSGO in 1994.
 


Saturday, December 8
Great Moments  (Monthly Meeting)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario

 

Quakers in the Attic
Jamey Burr will describe a difficult family circumstance that took decades to understand, followed by a breakthrough that revealed a past that could not have been imagined, taking family historians at the same time into some of North America’s most glorious and detestable histories.
 
About the speaker 
 
Jamey Burr is a retired federal public servant who devoted most of his career to increasing the supply of affordable housing and support services to Canada’s most vulnerable populations.
 
A McKinlay in New Zealand
It started as a simple yet, at the time, inexplicable hint on Ancestry. Follow Ken McKinlay's journey of discovery as he unveils his New Zealand connection and why his second cousin twice removed died "in Panama en route to New Zealand" in 1918.
 
About the speaker
 
Ken McKinlay's foray into his family history research started with three simple family stories that he wanted to confirm or refute. He has now been researching his family tree for over 18 years and discoveries are still being made. He has given talks for several branches of the Ontario Genealogical Society, BIFHSGO, and the Ottawa Public Library. His talks generally focus on methodologies and providing the skills needed to help solve those brick wall problems.
 
Open to the public



Saturday, January 12, 2019
A Brief History of BIFHSGO: celebrating 25 years  (Before BIFHSGO Education Talk)
9:00 am to 9:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario

Open to the public


Saturday, January 12, 2019
The Cowkeeper’s Wish: Transforming Family History into a Great Story  (Monthly Meeting)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario

Gathering names and dates of ancestors is an addictive, exhausting task, and while it’s satisfying to put the facts in order and fill in a tree’s branches, what’s more fascinating is exploring who these people were as individuals and how they fit into the times and places they occupied. Anyone who’s snooped in their own tree knows that even the most ordinary family contains great stories. Kristen den Hartog and Tracy Kasaboski discuss how to create a rich and wonderful story from a family archive, drawing on official documents as well as personal treasures like photographs, letters, and passed-down memories, and weaving them with events of the times. The sisters’ latest book, The Cowkeeper’s Wish, spans nearly a century, and is set in both England and Canada. They’ll talk about finding the thread of their story and putting several generations in context.
 
About the speakers
 
Kristen den Hartog and Tracy Kasaboski are sisters and co-authors of two family memoirs. The Occupied Garden: A Family History of War-Torn Holland was published to rave reviews in 2008 by McClelland & Stewart, and chronicles the lives of their father’s family in the Netherlands in WW II. Their most recent collaboration, The Cowkeeper’s Wish: A Genealogical Journey, delves into their maternal British roots, beginning in the 1840s, when their 3-times great-grandfather walked from Wales to London with his cows, in search of a better life. A working-class chronicle stitched into history, the tale follows the family line for nearly a century, through poverty, war, and love, and ends with the authors’ grandparents in London, Ontario, in the 1930s. The sisters blog about eclectic offshoots from their genealogical journey at thecowkeeperswish.com.

Open to the public


Saturday, January 19, 2019
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Group)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Rooms 226 and 228, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. All of us, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.
 
Open to the public



Saturday, February 9, 2019
An Exciting Future for BIFHSGO: the next 25 years  (Before BIFHSGO Education Talk)
9:00 am to 9:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
BIFHSGO President Duncan Monkhouse will present the Board's plans for the coming years.
 
Open to the public
 


Saturday, February 9, 2019
Lord Bathurst’s Settlers to Murray Township 1815-1817  (Monthly Meeting)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario

 

Many people are aware of the military settlements in Perth and Richmond established by Lord Bathurst, but a smaller and largely forgotten settlement that also took place on the Bay of Quinte at the same time. Brian Tackaberry will talk about this settlement, which was focused on the Canal Reserve lands set aside by Simcoe in 1796.  Disbanded soldiers from several regiments, including the Glengarry Fencibles and 41st Regiment, were given lands for their service. A small group of  loyal "Emigrants" and their families, mostly from London, England, were also settled on the land, to secure this important transportation site in case of future hostilities with the Americans.

 
About the speaker
 
Brian Tackaberry, a retired teacher, has served as a director with the North Lanark Highland Games in Almonte since 1984 and is a member and researcher for the North Lanark Historical Society. He has done extensive research on the Bay of Quinte region, doing several local cemetery and census transcriptions. His first book, entitled James McMasters and Family: to Quinte and Beyond, described his researches on the McMasters family. He has done extensive research in the military history of the Almonte area and was co-author of the publication The Lost Generation of Mississippi Mills: WWI Casualties to mark the 100th Anniversary of the start of WW 1.  His second book, Forgotten Heroes, dealt with Valour Award recipients from the war.
 
He is currently a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists, the New England Historic Genealogical Society, the United Empire Loyalists' Association of Canada, and the Ontario Genealogical Society.
 
Open to the public
 


Saturday, February 16, 2019
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Group)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Rooms 226 and 228, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. All of us, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.
 
Open to the public



Saturday, March 9, 2019
Research Opens Doors  (Before BIFHSGO Education Talk)
9:00 am to 9:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
During 30 years of genealogical research, many doors have opened for Gloria Tubman. Some of these doors, including genealogical brick walls, a public service career, and different ventures in retirement, will be highlighted to demonstrate how skills learned can transcend careers. 
 
About the speaker 
 
Gloria Tubman grew up in Pontiac County, Quebec, before moving to Ontario for school and work. Her areas of genealogical and historical research include British Home Children, Quebec, the Ottawa Valley and the families of Pontiac County. She has done research for the US television show Who Do You Think Your Are?  In addition, Gloria has published A Genealogists’ Guide to Researching British Home Children, and wrote the “Genealogy Gleanings” column in The Equity, Shawville’s weekly newspaper, for several years. She volunteers as a co-instructor of a genealogy course at the Ottawa Stake Family History Centre and is a consultant with the Ottawa Public Library Genealogy Drop-In Club. 
 
Open to the public


Saturday, March 9, 2019
Expanding that Empty Branch on the Genetic Family Tree  (Monthly Meeting)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Isobel (Ella) Moreland was born in July 1920 in Edinburgh, Scotland. After her birth, her mother placed her in the home of a childless couple to raise as their own. Then, in 1945, Ella came to Canada, the bride of a Canadian soldier. While Ella was always curious about her birth family, she never found the answers she sought. In this presentation, Marianne Rasmus will share Ella’s story as an adoptee and a war bride, and how her family came together to search for her birth family. Marianne will share how DNA, a little luck and old-fashioned research helped solve at least part of an almost 100-year-old mystery, and how the family has expanded beyond their wildest expectations.

About the speaker
 
Born and raised in Vancouver, Marianne Rasmus spent most of her life in BC, experiencing life on Vancouver Island, in BC’s north and in the Fraser Valley. But when the opportunity for a mid-life adventure came, Marianne and her husband Billtook the plunge and moved to Ottawa in 2013. After reluctantly taking Canadian History as a “filler” course in college, Marianne discovered an interest and passion for history she never expected. That interest took on new meaning, and some might say became an obsession, when she began her family history journey in 2008 and began to unearth long-forgotten stories in both hers and her husband’s family trees. Marianne and Bill have been married for almost 35 years and have two sons and two granddaughters.
 
Open to the public


Saturday, March 16, 2019
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Group)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Rooms 226 and 228, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. All of us, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.
 
Open to the public



Saturday, April 13, 2019
What’s in the BIFHSGO/OGS library for you?  (Before BIFHSGO Education Talk)
9:00 am to 9:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Pam Cooper of BIFHSGO and Grace Lewis of OGS will describe what the holdings in the BIFHSGO/OGS Ottawa Branch library offer to genealogists.
 
Open to the public


Saturday, April 13, 2019
All My Worldly Goods: Murder Mystery & a Personal Journey into the History of British Home Children  (Monthly Meeting)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
Maggie Wheeler will talk about what she discovered about Home Children while researching her latest novel, the newest addition to her popular series of murder mysteries set in the Lost Villages of the St. Lawrence Seaway, 
 
About the speaker
 
As the Seaway Valley’s “Queen of Crime,” Maggie Wheeler has spent almost two decades showcasing the social, cultural and psychological impact of the St. Lawrence Seaway and Power Project on the Canadians it affected.
 
She is the author of the best-selling Lost Villages historical murder mystery series, which has garnered a nomination for the Ontario Premier’s Awards for the Arts, an Ontario Provincial Hansard, and Seeker’s Awards for Literary Artist of the Year in 2013 and 2018. In January 2017, Maggie was named Ottawa’s Favourite Female Author by FACES Magazine Annual Awards—and was again a finalist for the award in 2018. The Lost Villages series has been used to teach English and history from intermediate to post-secondary levels in Eastern Ontario and Upper New York State.
 
Since 2001, her work with the Seaway history has kept Maggie on the public speaking circuit and in the media at local, regional, national and academic levels. Her most recent contribution is the “Lost Villages” article for Historica Canada’s The Canadian Encyclopedia—the official national online resource for all things Canadiana. Maggie recently launched her fifth Lost Villages novel, All My Worldly Goods, researched and written with the generous support of the Canada Council for the Arts.
 
Open to the public


Saturday, April 27, 2019
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Group)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Rooms 226 and 228, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. All of us, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.
 
Open to the public



Saturday, May 11, 2019
How to Create a Family Tree, Heritage or Genealogy Photo Book Using Picaboo  (Before BIFHSGO Education Talk)
9:00 am to 9:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
Picaboo is a web-based printing service which allows you to create a variety of beautiful, archival quality, personalized photo products. It's personal. It's customizable. Photo books make family history accessible to all family members. This Before BIFHSGO will illustrate how easy it is to use Picaboo for your projects. It will include tips for an efficient project, while maximizing the final effect. Most of these tips are applicable to other web-based printing services that are available.
 
About the speaker
 
Dena Palamedes has been exploring the joys of genealogy, a passion that draws on her skills acquired as an auditor, for the last six years. She loves to leverage the power of technology at work, in family history and through her photography.  She is currently the BIFHSGO photographer.
 
Open to the public


Saturday, May 11, 2019
The Ragman’s Children: A Story of 19th Century Economic Migration  (Monthly Meeting)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Arriving in the East End of London from Amsterdam in August 1867and making their way to the Dutch Jewish enclave in Whitechapel’s Spitalfields sector, Christine Jackson’s youthful great-grandparents must have wondered why they had left one slum neighbourhood for another. Years later, in struggling post-WW II Britain, the prevailing family story, which described successful tobacco and diamond merchants living in large houses with servants and having a cigar factory off London’s Edgware Road, seemed wildly incongruous. In 2003–04, their immediate links to the era having passed, Christine and her cousin Rod determined to unravel that family story. They found that the Internet, then about to change genealogical research forever, not only gave them the means to reconstruct their family’s place in Victorian London, but also revealed its humble early origins in The Netherlands. Christine will tell us about their search and its results.

About the speaker

A family historian for more than 40 years and an active member of BIFHSGO since 2002, Christine Jackson has made presentations to BIFHSGO and other regional societies on her Sussex County family history and on the results of her three-year research project on the history of the Ottawa Valley’s (unrelated) Cowley family. Her articles on these topics have been published both here and in England. One of Christine’s four grandparents was not, however, born and raised in Sussex, but was part of a family of economic migrants to England from Continental Europe. 
 
Open to the public

 



Saturday, May 25, 2019
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Group)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Rooms 226 and 228, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. All of us, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.
 
Open to the public



Saturday, June 8, 2019
Annual General Meeting  (Annual General Meeting)
9:00 am to 9:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Open to the public


Saturday, June 8, 2019
Great Moments  (Monthly Meeting)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Four BIFHSGO members will describe the exciting experience of breaking down a brick wall while researching their ancestors.
 
Open to the public


Saturday, June 15, 2019
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Group)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Rooms 226 and 228, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. All of us, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.
 
Open to the public



Saturday, September 21, 2019
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Group)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Rooms 226 and 228, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. All of us, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.