British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa
British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa
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Records: 1 to 9 of 9


Saturday, October 3
DNA Special Interest Group  (Special Interest Group)
9:30 am to 11:30 am
Online
 
Members meet to share experiences, information and ideas and learn about the use of DNA evidence in exploring family history. Attendees will be required to sign in and out at the reception desk on the ground floor.
 
Visit the DNA Research Guide for more information and links to online resources.
 
Open to the public


Saturday, October 10
Soldier, Settler, Sinner: The Remarkable Journey of Charles MacDonald  (Feature Talk)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
Online - registration required - link below
 
Jane Simpson will tell the story of her ancestor Charles MacDonald, an officer in the British Army, on his journey of chance, spanning three continents and experiencing a number of precarious circumstances.  Born into a life of relative ease in the North of England, tragedy struck and he found himself in the service of the King during the Napoleonic Wars.  Not always a saint and sometimes very much a sinner, he fathered seventeen children and swept them along in his journey from England to the West Indies and finally to the quiet shores of the Bay of Quinte on Lake Ontario.  Jane one day stunned her grandmother by asking an inconvenient question and the answer was not altogether convincing.  Fifty years later, she had her answer, finding many surprises and shocks for her MacDonald relatives.  Jane will relate her research leading to her book, Soldier, Settler and Sinner:  The Remarkable Journey of Charles MacDonald. Visit Jane's website at www.turtlepointbooks.com.
 
Click here to register.
 
About the speaker
Jane Simpson attended elementary school in Ottawa.  She completed her baccalaureate at the University of Ottawa and Masters at McGill University.   A retired nurse, she lives in Kanata, researching and writing, in addition to singing in choirs.  Her book about the MacDonalds in Belleville, Soldier, Settler, Sinner:  The Remarkable Journey of Charles MacDonald was selected as staff pick in Chapters/Indigo in Belleville.  Jane enjoys talking with other family historians through attendance at and presenting at workshops.  Archives are some of her favourite places.  She holds memberships in the United Empire Loyalists Association of Canada – Quinte Branch, Ontario Genealogical Society – Quinte Branch, Hastings County Historical Society and the 7th Town Historical Society in Prince Edward County.   In Ottawa, she is member in the Ottawa Independent Writers Group and Capital Crime Writers.


Saturday, October 24
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Group)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
Online
 
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. All of us, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.
 



Wednesday, November 4
British Colonial SIG  (Special Interest Group)
7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Online
 
For those interested in being added to the BCA mailing list and receiving invitations to the online meetings, please contact treasurer@bifhsgo.ca.


Saturday, November 7
DNA Special Interest Group  (Special Interest Group)
9:30 am to 11:30 am
Room 115, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Members meet to share experiences, information and ideas and learn about the use of DNA evidence in exploring family history. Attendees will be required to sign in and out at the reception desk on the ground floor.
 
Visit the DNA Research Guide for more information and links to online resources.
 
Open to the public


Saturday, November 14
Going Down of the Sun  (Feature Talk)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
Online - registration required, information to follow
 
In churches, schools and public buildings across Canada there are brass plaques bearing the names of people long dead, and generally unremarked by those who pass by.  There are two such plaques on the wall of Knox Presbyterian Church, Ottawa, and every Remembrance Sunday we are reminded that those named on the plaques were part of the congregational family.  At the end of the service, we solemnly declare: “At the Going Down of the Sun, and In the Morning, We Will Remember Them”. But how can we remember those we never knew? Who were these people, mourned by friends, lovers, wives and children?   What were their aspirations and dreams?  A search of school records, memoirs, official histories, church and military records reveals the person; knowing the person helps us to fulfill that solemn declaration.
 
About the speaker:
Philip G Winkelaar worked as a family physician for 27 years, then as a geriatrician and physician advisor for another 16. Childhood memories include his father handing in his gas mask at the end of WW2 and the next-door neighbor who had one blind eye, scarred by mustard gas in WW1. Philip served nearly 20 years in the regular and reserve armed forces. He has spoken at the Society for the History of Medicine, many medical conventions and at the Medical History Club of Ottawa, and published several articles. He has attended Knox Presbyterian Church Ottawa for 24 years. The commemorative plaques on the sanctuary wall inspired his research into the people named there and resulted in publication in 2018 of a book titled Going Down of the Sun.


Saturday, November 28
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Group)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
Online
 
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. All of us, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.
 



Wednesday, December 2
British Colonial SIG  (Special Interest Group)
7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Online
 
For those interested in being added to the BCA mailing list and receiving invitations to the online meetings, please contact treasurer@bifhsgo.ca.


Saturday, December 12
Great Moments in Genealogy  (Feature Talk)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
Online - registration required, information to follow
 
The Purvis Family of Manitoulin Island – Achievement, Tragedy and the Worst Disaster in Great Lakes Maritime History
 
Jamey Burr will tell the story of his mother’s family, who came from the east coast of Scotland to start a significant family fishing business on Lake Huron. The story includes tales of international travel on the jute trade route, early political activity in Upper Canada, lighthouse keepers, the Klondike, family losses, and a sad role related to the enormous loss of life on the S.S. Eastland in 1915.
 
About the Speaker
Jamey Burr was formerly a federal public servant involved in funding programs for affordable housing and infrastructure.  He gave a December Great Moments talk in 2018 about breaking through a brick wall to find his Quaker roots in colonial America and Canada.
 
Ellen Murray and the Lady Sherbrooke
 
Various family accounts tell us that Ellen Murray survived a shipwreck in the Gulf of St. Lawrence on her way to Canada from Ireland sometime between 1830 and 1833, after which she married Michael MacNeil’s great great grandfather, James Tompkins in Margaree, Cape Breton.  A search of shipwreck databases indicates that she was most likely on the Lady Sherbrooke, sailing from Derry, Ireland in June 1831.  It ran aground near Cape Ray, Newfoundland on the night of July 19th, with as many as three hundred persons drowning.  While researching the various accounts of the shipwreck in contemporary and later newspapers, Michael discovered that false news is not a recent phenomenon, but can be enduring.
 
About the speaker
Michael MacNeil is a retired academic, born in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. Most of his Canadian family roots were in place in Cape Breton by 1830, primarily as a result of Irish and Scottish immigration. In the past few years he has become fascinated with family history, both his own and that of other settlers in the community in which he grew up.  He is always on the lookout for good stories, preferably true, but he also takes pleasure in good yarns.
 
Ballinasloe after the potato famine
 
After the Irish famine, Hugh  Reekie's forebear William Maxwell, a civil engineer and architect, was very involved in designing houses, farms and factories. Hugh will take us on a grand tour of Ballinasloe, telling us the history of the town and area, finishing up with a family gravestone - in a very interesting location!
 
About the Speaker
Hugh Reekie has been expanding his grandfather's family research for many years. He has produced results with presentations (one in Aberystwyth, Wales), web pages with innovative family trees and small paper documents of segments of his tree.  One such document was used as an example when he gave a full-day workshop to BIFHSGO members on "family tree history publication, my way"  a few years ago.

Open to the public.