British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa
British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa
Filter by Category:  
Timeframe:

Search:   For:    Search  Clear Search
Listings Per Page: 

Records: 1 to 5 of 5


Saturday, February 9
Lord Bathurst’s Settlers to Murray Township 1815-1817
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario

 

Many people are aware of the military settlements in Perth and Richmond established by Lord Bathurst, but a smaller settlement that also took place on the Bay of Quinte at the same time is largley forgotten. Brian Tackaberry will talk about this settlement, which was focused on the Canal Reserve lands set aside by Simcoe in 1796. Disbanded soldiers from several regiments, including the Glengarry Fencibles and the 41st Regiment, were given lands for their service. A small group of  loyal "Emigrants" and their families, mostly from London, England, were also settled on the land, to secure this important transportation site in case of future hostilities with the Americans.

 
About the speaker
 
Brian Tackaberry, a retired teacher, has served as a director with the North Lanark Highland Games in Almonte since 1984 and is a member and researcher for the North Lanark Historical Society. He has done extensive research on the Bay of Quinte region, doing several local cemetery and census transcriptions. His first book, entitled James McMasters and Family: to Quinte and Beyond, described his researches on the McMasters family. He has done extensive research in the military history of the Almonte area and was co-author of the publication The Lost Generation of Mississippi Mills: WWI Casualties to mark the 100th Anniversary of the start of WW 1.  His second book, Forgotten Heroes, dealt with Valour Award recipients from the war.
 
He is currently a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists, the New England Historic Genealogical Society, the United Empire Loyalists' Association of Canada, and the Ontario Genealogical Society.
 
Open to the public



Saturday, March 9
To be announced
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Open to the public



Saturday, April 13
All My Worldly Goods: Murder Mystery & a Personal Journey into the History of British Home Children
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Maggie Wheeler will talk about what she discovered about Home Children while researching her latest novel, the newest addition to her popular series of murder mysteries set in the Lost Villages of the St. Lawrence Seaway, 
 
About the speaker
 
As the Seaway Valley’s “Queen of Crime,” Maggie Wheeler has spent almost two decades showcasing the social, cultural and psychological impact of the St. Lawrence Seaway and Power Project on the Canadians it affected.
 
She is the author of the best-selling Lost Villages historical murder mystery series, which has garnered a nomination for the Ontario Premier’s Awards for the Arts, an Ontario Provincial Hansard, and Seeker’s Awards for Literary Artist of the Year in 2013 and 2018. In January 2017, Maggie was named Ottawa’s Favourite Female Author by FACES Magazine Annual Awards—and was again a finalist for the award in 2018. The Lost Villages series has been used to teach English and history from intermediate to post-secondary levels in Eastern Ontario and Upper New York State.
 
Since 2001, her work with the Seaway history has kept Maggie on the public speaking circuit and in the media at local, regional, national and academic levels. Her most recent contribution is the “Lost Villages” article for Historica Canada’s The Canadian Encyclopedia—the official national online resource for all things Canadiana. Maggie recently launched her fifth Lost Villages novel, All My Worldly Goods, researched and written with the generous support of the Canada Council for the Arts.
 
Open to the public



Saturday, May 11
The Ragman’s Children: A Story of 19th Century Economic Migration
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Arriving in the East End of London from Amsterdam in August 1867and making their way to the Dutch Jewish enclave in Whitechapel’s Spitalfields sector, Christine Jackson’s youthful great-grandparents must have wondered why they had left one slum neighbourhood for another. Years later, in struggling post-WW II Britain, the prevailing family story, which described successful tobacco and diamond merchants living in large houses with servants and having a cigar factory off London’s Edgware Road, seemed wildly incongruous. In 2003–04, their immediate links to the era having passed, Christine and her cousin Rod determined to unravel that family story. They found that the Internet, then about to change genealogical research forever, not only gave them the means to reconstruct their family’s place in Victorian London, but also revealed its humble early origins in The Netherlands. Christine will tell us about their search and its results.

About the speaker

A family historian for more than 40 years and an active member of BIFHSGO since 2002, Christine Jackson has made presentations to BIFHSGO and other regional societies on her Sussex County family history and on the results of her three-year research project on the history of the Ottawa Valley’s (unrelated) Cowley family. Her articles on these topics have been published both here and in England. One of Christine’s four grandparents was not, however, born and raised in Sussex, but was part of a family of economic migrants to England from Continental Europe. 
 
Open to the public

 




Saturday, June 8
Great Moments
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
 
Four BIFHSGO members will describe the exciting experience of breaking down a brick wall while researching their ancestors.
 
Open to the public